The Life and Times of a Suburban Blue Bird

The suburbs are an interesting place to live in Mississippi. There is a part of the city mixed with some of the benefits of living out among nature. One of the most intriguing parts of this life is the observation of the variety of birds. My yard is filled with doves, cardinals, blue birds, wrens and robins all trying to feast on the bird feeders containing sunflower seeds. The lives of all of the birds are fun and interesting to watch. There are no predators in the yard so the birds enjoy the security of abundant food.

Jess built some bird houses and posted them on the fence. One of the first residents in the bird house is a male and female bluebird. The male is majestic in his blue color as he sports through the yard. He is looking a bit ruffled since bumbling the morning battle with another male blue bird. The female is beautiful but not as full of color. She is checking out the variety of houses looking for the perfect nesting spot.

The pair finally decide on a house in the corner of the yard and begin building a nest. The blue birds bring small twigs and other treasures to fill the nest. Some of the treasures for this nest come from our yard. There was a thunderstorm the night before and small twigs and leaves are now in the yard. Building the nest is a slow process that is observed for days before finally being finished. When the birds have move in we can see the twigs resting on the inside of the house.

It is not long before the nest is filled with eggs. The blue birds guard this nest very aggressively from any perceived predators. Some of the air battles with other birds are entertaining to watch. We have also observed a squirrel being chased away from the nest by the blue birds. They are serious protectors when it comes to their family.

Bluebird Jess

The female blue bird sits on the nest for hours each day. She rests her head on the entrance hole to house continually observing activity close to the house. The male will visit several times a day. He will often bring food and guard the nest while the female leaves to find food. This process will continue for a few weeks until the eggs are hatched.

After the eggs are hatched the young birds chirp in anticipation of the food their parents will bring. The birds feed their young several times a day. While we have several bird feeders containing sunflower seed, the female prefers to feed her young family spiders and other sources of protein. The bird house is close to a wooded area providing an abundance of this type of food.

Bluebird with spider jess

After a few weeks the young blue birds are ready to fly away.  The blue birds will continue to be with their young family for quite a while.  They will leave the bird house and teach the young birds how to live in the woods. Eventually the young blue birds will leave the parents to pursue their own lives.

Jess cleaned the bird house and discovered a small blue egg that did not develop. It was a pretty egg and I am sad that it did not hatch. The cycle of life can be disheartening at times. Sometimes there is loss in the renewal of life for these birds. The bird house is empty now waiting to be discovered by a new couple of birds in search of a nesting site.

A few days ago we observed a new male and female blue bird looking at another bird house in the yard. It appears that the cycle will begin anew. The new blue birds are bringing new twigs and other treasures to the bird house. Soon there will be eggs and the cycle of life will begin again.  Jess and I are looking forward to observing this young family grow and flourish. Nature is wonderful in life and abundance in this spring season.

Copyright 2017 Debbie Pierce

 

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13 responses to “The Life and Times of a Suburban Blue Bird

  1. Here in Tucson our two favorites are doves and hummingbirds, plus the Arizona cardinal, a thrill when we spot one. But the doves build a nest in our carport and our hummingbird feeders always attract a crowd. They are wonderful to watch. They have a drink of nectar and then go zipping here and there.

  2. Hmm.. Are you a birdwatcher? Nice post.. I especially like the part about the birds not paying any rent(pun intended).. But yeah felt sorry for the egg..

  3. Pingback: Bumble When You Work – TyroCharm·

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